New Year’s Resolutions

This week’s Booking Through Thursday:

Happy New Year, everyone!

So … any Reading Resolutions? Say, specific books you plan to read? A plan to read more ____? Anything at all?

Name me at least ONE thing you’re looking forward to reading this year!

1. Read more Australian literature

This is always one of my New Year’s Resolutions, and in 2009, I’m determined to actually read more Australian lit. Just so I won’t back my way out with excuses (“so many other books to read”,  “maybe next year”) I compiled a list this time. Click here to see it.

2. Complete all 2009 challenges/reading lists

I began this blog in April of 2008, so it’s my first official year doing challenges. I signed myself up for thirteen of them – and put down a ridiculous amount of books to read – so I’m not sure how well I’ll go. Because, of course, there are my ongoing projects and my personal goal to read the complete works of my favourite (and not so favourite) writers.

3. Read at least two books from each of my ongoing projects

Nobels: Gao Xingjian’s Soul Mountain and Love in the Time of Cholera, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Australian Literature:Eucalyptus, Murray Bail and We of the Never Never, Aeneas Gunn

Summer Reading List: Unaccustomed Earth, Jhumpa Lahiri and The Go-Between, L P Hartley (if I can find the latter – haven’t seen it at bookstores)

A Daring Book project: Matilda, Roald Dahl and The Complete Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales

1001 Books: The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood and Quo Vadis, Henryk Sienkiewicz

4. Read more Shakespeare, Woolf, Tolstoy, Gaskell, Dickens, Murakami, Bronte, Eliot, Austen, Ondaatje and Ishiguro

These are the authors whom I have chosen to read the complete works of. To read just one of their works (each) in 2009 will be enough, I think.

(* re-reads)

Shakespeare: Othello *, Much Ado About Nothing

Woolf: The Waves, The Voyage Out

Tolstoy: Anna Karenina, War and Peace

Gaskell: Cranford, Wives and Daughters

Dickens: Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities

Murakami: Norwegian Wood, Kafka on the Shore

Bronte (Charlotte): Villette*

Eliot: Middlemarch

Austen: Northanger Abbey *, Persuasion *

Ondaatje:  The Cinnamon Peeler (poetry), In the Skin of a Lion

Ishiguro: A Pale View of Hills, The Remains of the Day

5. Read more nonfiction!

Which I’ll be doing through the World Citizenship challenge, and the Essay Reading challenge, and the Themed Reading challenge.

Happy New Year, everyone! :)

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13 thoughts on “New Year’s Resolutions

  1. You’ve set some amazing reading resolutions! Thanks for the list of Australian literature…I would like to read some of those myself.

    Happy reading :)

    1. Becca – I like yours much better! I’m beginning to think all these lists and challenges are not so healthy for my reading habits, because I often feel trapped. Maybe in 2010, I’ll go with spontaneity once again.

      Nicole – hahah, yes, if all these lists were actual piles of books, I’m pretty sure they would have toppled over by now. Thanks again for the recommendation :)

  2. Happy New Year!

    Gosh, that’s an awful lot of challenges! I haven’t come across some of them – the Daring Book Challenge for example, but are Matilda and The Complete Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales really daring books? I’ll have to look at this challenge – can you give me the link? And are you reading Le Petit Prince in French?

    1. Oh no, I don’t think they’re meant to be ‘daring’ for anyone over the age of 10. There’s a book for little girls called “The Daring Book for Girls” and it’s a sort of vintage style handbook they made for modern children who don’t know what skipping ropes and yo-yo’s are. At the back of it, I think there’s a list of books that all girls should read. The reason why there’s no link to the challenge on my page is b/c I’m not reading the full list, and it’s an ongoing project for me so I’m not following their time limit. But yes. Here’s the site:

      http://daringbookchallenge.blogspot.com/

      And no, the original list had the title in French and I just got it straight off there. I’ll be reading it in English :)

  3. Tuesday, this is off topic.. I’m still trying to figure things out with wordpress. I just don’t like that I couldn’t change the fonts. (I’m font-obsessed ha ha.) But I found one template with the font I like except then I couldn’t customize the header. So.. will see what happens. :D

    1. zawan – I hope so; but I’ve decided not to get my hopes up just in case. Marquez appears to be another love or detest author.

      claire – that’s what always happens with me. There’ll always be one small thing that’s wrong with each template. Now I’m too attached to WordPress and its super Dashboard, and it’s too late to leave :(

  4. That’s true, the WP dashboard is what’s luring me. If they only had the font feature I wouldn’t hesitate. Garcia Marquez is my fave author but I know two friends who found him boring.

  5. Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz has been sitting on my shelf for a long time. I should give it some love this year, finally!

    I’m skimping out on challenges because I tend to bow out after I’m running out of ideas for books. I stay with maybe two, at most three and take my time with them.

    I signed up for World Citizen Challenge which will be a great incentive to read more non-fiction.

    1. claire – yes, fonts, but also generally, I get annoyed that I can’t edit the CSS without paying for it. Maybe I’m just stingy, but I wouldn’t pay money just to change one little thing about a web template – and it’s usually just little things that bug me. The width of a template, or the placement of a header; things like that…

      Matthew – I think I’ll end up re-using my challenge lists in the years ahead. I can’t possibly read that many books in one year; don’t think it’s humanly possible for something with school/work. I’ve already created a ‘Leftovers’ page, hahah, for all the books left over from this year’s challenges :)

      Look forward to reading your thoughts on Quo Vadis, if you do get around to it in 2009.

  6. For more Australian reads, check out Reading Matter’s blog
    kimbofo.typepad.com/readingmatters

    She is always finding authors that I have never heard of from Australia.

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